L’importanza del poter azionare un marchio di rinomanza, invece che ordinario

Marcel Pemsel su IPKat segnala Cancellation Division EUIPO n. C 57137 del 25 aprile 2024, Luis Vuitton c. Yang, come esempio dell’utilità pratica dell’optare per l’azione basata sulla rinomanza nei casi in cui è dubbio ricorrano i requisiti per quella sulla tutela ordinaria.

Non si può che convenirne. Ma quanto ha speso LV nei decenni per il suo marketing?

Marcbio depositato da Yang:

Abnteriuorità azionata da LV:

Ebbene, la domanda di annullamento è accolta sulla base della rinomanza.,

<<Therefore, taking into account and weighing up all the relevant factors of the present case, it must be concluded that, when encountering the contested mark, the relevant consumers will be likely to associate it with the earlier sign, that is to say, establish a mental ‘link’ between the signs. However, although a ‘link’ between the signs is a necessary condition for further assessing whether detriment or unfair advantage are likely, the existence of such a link is not sufficient, in itself, for a finding that there may be one of the forms of damage referred to in Article 8(5) EUTMR (26/09/2012, T‑301/09, CITIGATE / CITICORP et al., EU:T:2012:473, § 96)>>.

Poi sull’unfair advantgege: The Cancellation Division agrees with the applicant’s arguments. The contested sign will, through its similarity with the earlier reputed trade mark, attract more consumers to the EUTM proprietor’s goods and will therefore benefit from the reputation of the earlier trade mark. A substantial number of consumers may decide to turn to the EUTM proprietor’s goods due to the mental association with the applicant’s reputed mark, thus misappropriating its powers of attraction and advertising value. This may stimulate the sales of the EUTM proprietor’s goods to an extent that they may be disproportionately high in comparison with the size of the EUTM proprietor’s own promotional investment. It may lead to the unacceptable situation where the EUTM proprietor is allowed to take a ‘free-ride’ on the investment of the applicant in promoting and building up goodwill for the EUTM proprietor’s sign. This would give the EUTM proprietor a competitive advantage since its goods would benefit from the extra attractiveness they would gain from the association with the applicant’s earlier mark. The applicant’s leather goods are known for their traditional manufacturing methods, handcrafted from the highest quality raw materials. The earlier mark is identified with the image of luxury, glamour, exclusivity and quality of the products, and those characteristics can easily be transferred to the contested goods.

Manca del resto la due cause (difesa ai limiti della responsabilità aggravata, civilprocessualmente):

The EUTM proprietor claimed to have due cause for using the contested mark because (1) a search of trade mark registers with effect in the EU did not reveal any trade marks identical or similar to the contested sign; and (2) the name of the famous Italian Piazza Vittorio is the inspiration for the name ‘VITTORIO’. The applicant wanted to dedicate her brand to Italianism, to Rome and to the place where she lives with her family.

These EUTM proprietor arguments do not amount to ‘due cause’ within the meaning of Article 8(5) EUTMR. Due cause under Article 8(5) EUTMR means that, notwithstanding the detriment caused to, or unfair advantage taken of, the distinctive character or reputation of the earlier trade mark, registration and use by the EUTM proprietor of the mark for the contested goods may be justified if the EUTM proprietor cannot be reasonably required to abstain from using the contested mark, or if the EUTM proprietor has a specific right to use the mark for such goods that takes precedence over the earlier trade mark. In particular, the condition of due cause is not fulfilled merely by the fact that a search of trade mark registers having effect in the EU has not revealed any trade marks identical or similar to the contested sign. Nor can the fact that ‘VITTORIO’ coincides with the name of a square in Turin justify its use as part of the sign, which would take unfair advantage of the reputation built up through the efforts of the proprietor of the earlier mark.

Ci sono anche ragine considerazione in fatto suilla provba dell’uso di cu iè onerata LV ed art. 64 c.23 -3 EUTMR

Istruzioni sulla prova della rinomanza dei marchi dal Tribunale UE (che viene normalmente acquisita e persa con gradualità)

Trib. UE 24.04.2024, T-157/23, Kneipp GmbH c. EUIPO-Patou:

<<Whether the earlier mark has a reputation and the burden of proof in relation to that reputation

19 In that regard, it must be borne in mind that, according to the case-law, in order to satisfy the requirement of reputation, a mark must be known to a significant part of the public concerned by the goods or services covered by that trade mark. In examining that condition, it is necessary to take into consideration all the relevant facts of the case, in particular the market share held by the earlier mark, the intensity, geographical extent and duration of its use, and the size of the investment made by the undertaking in promoting it. There is, however, no requirement for that mark to be known by a given percentage of the relevant public or for its reputation to cover all the territory concerned, so long as that reputation exists in a substantial part of that territory (see judgment of 12 February 2015, Compagnie des montres Longines, Francillon v OHIM – Staccata (QUARTODIMIGLIO QM), T‑76/13, not published, EU:T:2015:94, paragraph 87 and the case-law cited).

20 However, the above list being merely illustrative, it cannot be required that proof of the reputation of a mark pertains to all those elements (see judgment of 26 June 2019, Balani Balani and Others v EUIPO – Play Hawkers (HAWKERS), T‑651/18, not published, EU:T:2019:444, paragraph 24 and the case-law cited).

21 Furthermore, an overall assessment of the evidence adduced by the proprietor of the earlier mark must be carried out in order to establish whether that mark has a reputation (see, to that effect, judgment of 10 May 2012, Rubinstein and L’Oréal v OHIM, C‑100/11 P, EU:C:2012:285, paragraph 72). An accumulation of items of evidence may allow the necessary facts to be established, even though each of those items of evidence, taken individually, may be insufficient to constitute proof of the accuracy of those facts (see judgment of 26 June 2019, HAWKERS, T‑651/18, not published, EU:T:2019:444, paragraph 29 and the case-law cited).

22 Next, it should be noted that the reputation of an earlier mark must be established as at the filing date of the application for registration of the mark applied for (judgment of 5 October 2020, Laboratorios Ern v EUIPO – SBS Bilimsel Bio Çözümler (apiheal), T‑51/19, not published, EU:T:2020:468, paragraph 112). Documents bearing a date after that date cannot be denied evidential value if they enable conclusions to be drawn with regard to the situation as it was on that date. It cannot automatically be ruled out that a document drawn up some time before or after that date may contain useful information in view of the fact that the reputation of a trade mark is, in general, acquired progressively. The evidential value of such a document is likely to vary depending on whether the period covered is close to or distant from the filing date (see judgment of 16 October 2018, VF International v EUIPO – Virmani (ANOKHI), T‑548/17, not published, EU:T:2018:686, paragraph 104 and the case-law cited; see also, by analogy, order of 27 January 2004, La Mer Technology, C‑259/02, EU:C:2004:50, paragraph 31).

23 In the present case, the reputation of the earlier mark had to be established as at 29 November 2019, the date on which the application for registration of the mark applied for was filed. The Board of Appeal found, in paragraph 46 of the contested decision, that, as a whole, the evidence submitted by the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO demonstrated convincingly that the earlier mark enjoyed a strong reputation, at least in France, which constitutes a substantial part of the territory of the European Union, in respect of perfumery and fragrances in Class 3 for which, inter alia, the earlier mark was registered.

24 In particular, it should be noted that, in order to find that the reputation of the earlier mark had been established, the Board of Appeal relied on the evidence referred to in paragraph 6 of the contested decision, namely, a statement signed by a representative of the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO, various copies of licence agreements or agreements conferring rights in respect of a trade mark JOY between that party and third parties, images of products, several extracts from websites of the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO and third parties, a large number of articles and press cuttings, extracts from books, advertisements, numerous invoices and extracts from ‘tweets’.

25 In the first place, it is necessary to examine the applicant’s argument that the documents produced by the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO, the existence of which is not disputed, do not provide evidence of the reputation of the earlier mark in a significant part of the relevant territory in the absence, in particular, of information concerning the market share of the earlier mark.

26 In that regard, as a preliminary point, it is necessary to reject the applicant’s arguments suggesting that the evidence intended to prove the reputation of the earlier mark in Member States other than the French Republic is irrelevant. While it is true that the Board of Appeal found that the earlier mark had a reputation ‘at least in France’ and that that State constituted a substantial part of the territory of the European Union, that does not mean that the evidence relating to other Member States is irrelevant. On the contrary, the latter evidence further supports the Board of Appeal’s finding, by demonstrating in particular the geographical scope of the earlier mark’s reputation, and must therefore be taken into consideration.

27 First, it should be noted that the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO produced (i) numerous online articles (exhibit 7) showing that the perfume Joy was voted, in 2000, ‘Scent of the Century’ by the UK FiFi Awards, which is described as ‘perfume’s ultimate accolade’, and (ii) a screenshot of the Fragrance Foundation’s website (exhibit 6), referring to the listing of the perfume Joy on the ‘Hall of Fame’ of that foundation in 1990. As noted by the Board of Appeal, those awards are prestigious awards, which involve both longstanding use of the earlier mark and recognition of that mark by the relevant public.

28 Second, the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO produced various extracts from books, articles and press cuttings (exhibits 4, 5, 12 and Annex 2) showing, inter alia, the use of the earlier mark for perfumes and fragrances and attesting that a significant part of the relevant public, in particular in France, knew the perfume Joy. The numerous extracts from articles, the date and place of publication of which can for the most part be identified, relate in particular to the years 2013, 2014, 2016 and 2017 and were published in several Member States, namely, Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Estonia, Italy, Portugal and, mainly, France, in fashion and beauty magazines of national or international importance, such as Elle, Grazia, Gala or Vogue. Several articles, dated from 2015 to 2017, describe the perfume Joy as the ‘second best-selling perfume of all time’, ‘one of the most popular and successful fragrances in the world’, ‘a strong rival to the number one best-selling fragrance of all time’. Lastly, several books on perfumery deal with the perfume Joy, listing it as one of ‘the five greatest perfumes in the world’, or as one of the ‘111 perfumes you must smell before you die’ or describing it as ‘one of the greatest floral perfumes ever created’. Finally, a selection of ‘tweets’ dated from the period between 2013 and 2015 (exhibit 14) demonstrates the social media presence of the earlier mark.

29 Third, the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO produced 27 invoices (exhibit 11) corresponding to advertising campaigns, which it carried out in 2013, 2014 and 2018, not only in the press, but also on television at a significant cost, in order to promote the earlier mark.

30 Fourth, the abovementioned factors are supported by a large number of invoices (exhibit 16) relating to sales involving several thousand products covered by the earlier mark, in an amount of tens of thousands of euro, to various distributors in several Member States, namely, Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, Germany, Estonia, Spain, France, Italy, Lithuania, Hungary, Portugal and Romania, for the years 2013 to 2018.

31 In the light of the case-law cited in paragraphs 20 and 21 above, it follows from the foregoing that, assessed as a whole, that evidence establishes that the earlier mark has a reputation in a substantial part of the territory of the European Union, in particular in France, as regards perfumery and fragrances in Class 3.

32 The other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO made significant efforts and investments in order to promote the earlier mark among the general public and in particular among the French general public. Those efforts took the form of significant advertising campaigns, a media presence in newspapers and magazines aimed at the general public and widely distributed within the European Union. Furthermore, the sales invoices submitted which related mainly to sales of perfumes and ‘eaux de parfums’ support the abovementioned factors demonstrating, inter alia, the wide geographical coverage of the earlier mark on that territory and a constant effort on the part of the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO to maintain its market share, at least until 2018.

33 Those documents, as well as the prestigious awards won by the perfume Joy, make it possible to establish that the earlier mark is widely known by the general public, in relation to the goods which it designates, in a substantial part of the territory of the European Union, even though those awards date back several years and sales figures fell between 2013 and 2018. In the latter regard, it should be noted that, in any event, the earlier mark enjoyed a high degree of reputation in the past, which, even if it were to be assumed that it may have diminished over the years, still survived at the date of filing the application for registration of the mark applied for in 2019; accordingly, a certain ‘surviving’ reputation remained at that date (see, to that effect, judgment of 8 May 2014, Simca Europe v OHIM – PSA Peugeot Citroën (Simca), T‑327/12, EU:T:2014:240, paragraphs 46, 49 and 52).

34 Thus, the applicant’s argument that a significant part of the relevant public are teenagers who were not born when the perfume Joy won those awards and that adults aged 18 to 29 were not aware of the historical events, such as the awards and mentions in books at the relevant time, is unfounded. As EUIPO correctly submits, those parts of the relevant public may become aware of the long-lasting reputation of the earlier mark, without necessarily being the witnesses of all the awards and public praise achieved by the earlier mark in the past, and may come into contact with that mark, by way of example, through digital advertising, billboards or the printed press. Moreover, the EU judicature has already held that it cannot be ruled out that a ‘historical’ mark may retain a certain ‘surviving’ reputation, including where that mark is no longer used (see, to that effect, judgment of 8 May 2014, Simca, T‑327/12, EU:T:2014:240, paragraphs 46, 49 and 52).

35 Furthermore, such reasoning also applies to the applicant’s argument that a significant part of the relevant public does not frequent luxury retail outlets, with the result that it cannot know the perfume Joy which is sold only by selected and prominent luxury retailers. First, the public concerned acquires and retains knowledge of a mark in several ways, in particular by visiting in person retail outlets where the corresponding products are sold, but also by other means such as those described in paragraph 34 above. Second, even consumers in the general public who cannot afford to purchase luxury branded goods are often exposed to them and are familiar with them (see, to that effect, judgment of 19 October 2022, Louis Vuitton Malletier v EUIPO – Wisniewski (Representation of a chequerboard pattern II), T‑275/21, not published, EU:T:2022:654, paragraph 47).

36 Furthermore, contrary to what the applicant claims, the fact that the market share held by the earlier mark has not been established by the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO does not necessarily mean that the reputation of the earlier mark has not been established. First, as is apparent from the case-law cited in paragraphs 19 and 20 above, the list of factors to be taken into account in order to assess the reputation of an earlier mark is indicative and not mandatory, as all the relevant evidence in the case must be taken into account and, second, the detailed and verifiable evidence produced by the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO is sufficient in itself to establish conclusively the reputation of the earlier mark for the purposes of Article 8(5) of Regulation 2017/1001 (see judgment of 14 September 2022, Itinerant Show Room v EUIPO – Save the Duck (ITINERANT), T‑417/21, not published, EU:T:2022:561, paragraph 86 and the case-law cited).

37 In the second place, the applicant also relies on the fact that the Board of Appeal assumed that the earlier mark had a reputation and wrongly stated that it was for the applicant to prove a drastic loss of reputation of the earlier mark between 2018 and 29 November 2019, the filing date of the mark applied for.

38 As recalled in the case-law cited in paragraph 22 above, it cannot automatically be ruled out that a document drawn up some time before or after the filing date of the application for registration of the mark at issue may contain useful information in view of the fact that the reputation of a trade mark is, in general, acquired progressively. The same reasoning applies to the loss of such a reputation, which is also, in general, lost gradually. The evidential value of such a document is likely to vary depending on whether the period covered is close to or distant from the filing date.

39 Thus, evidence which predates the filing date of the application for registration of the contested mark cannot be deprived of probative value on the sole ground that it bears a date which predates that filing date by five years (judgment of 5 October 2020, apiheal, T‑51/19, not published, EU:T:2020:468, paragraph 112).

40 It is also apparent from the case-law that, as regards the burden of proof in relation to reputation, it is borne by the proprietor of the earlier mark (see judgment of 5 October 2022, Puma v EUIPO – CMS (CMS Italy), T‑711/20, not published, EU:T:2022:604, paragraph 83 and the case-law cited).

41 In the present case, in paragraph 34 of the contested decision, the Board of Appeal, after recalling that the application for registration had been filed on 29 November 2019, emphasised that most of the evidence submitted related to the period between 2013 and 2017 and that some of that evidence dated back to 1990, 2000 or 2006; however, it noted that the evidence in fact contained indications concerning the continuous efforts of the other party to the proceedings before the Board of Appeal of EUIPO to maintain its market share in 2018, before adding that ‘the loss of reputation rarely happens as a single occurrence but is rather a continuing process over a long period of time, as the reputation is usually built up over a period of years and cannot simply be switched on and off’ and that ‘in addition, such drastic loss of reputation for a short period of time would be up to the applicant to prove’.

42 Thus, contrary to what the applicant claims, that assessment does not constitute a reversal of the burden of proof and is consistent with the case-law cited in paragraphs 38 to 40 above. In the absence of concrete evidence showing that the reputation progressively acquired by the earlier mark over many years suddenly disappeared during the last year under examination, the Board of Appeal was entitled to conclude that the earlier mark still had a reputation on 29 November 2019, the relevant date (see, by analogy, judgment of 7 January 2004, Aalborg Portland and Others v Commission, C‑204/00 P, C‑205/00 P, C‑211/00 P, C‑213/00 P, C‑217/00 P and C‑219/00 P, EU:C:2004:6, paragraph 79).

43 Therefore, the first complaint of the single plea in law must be rejected>>.

Non c’è confondibilità (somiglianza tra segni) se il marchio denominativo altrui è assai tenuamente evocato, anzi lasciato solo intuire

Si considerino i segni a paragone:

SEcondo il board of appeal EUIPO 19.02.2024, case R 1147/2023-1, Hyundai v. Global Trade services, non c’è somiglianza tra segni e quindi il primo è registrabile.

<<Contrary to the opponent’s claims, the Board agrees with the contested decision that consumers will not be able to read any letters in the contested sign but will perceive only vertical bars of different heights, two of which have dots. The contested sign is missing the horizontal lines, which is an essential component of the normal graphic representation of the verbal element ‘hyundai’, without which the relevant public will have difficulty in recognising that verbal element. Consequently, the contested sign will not be immediately and without any mental effort recognised as the verbal element ‘hyundai’. It is much more probable that the contested sign will be recognised only as the combination of some basic figurative elements. Only after an in-depth analysis, which consumers do not tend to perform (26/03/2021, R 551/2018-G, Device (fig.) / Device (fig.), § 52), might very stylised representations of the verbal element ‘hyundai’ be perceive>>

Marcel Pemsel in IPkat dà notizia della e link alla decisione.

Curiosamente una sua ricerca nella AI Gemini di Google gli dà questo esito: <<The image you sent me appears to be a trademark image filed with the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). It depicts a blue logo on a white background, but without any additional context, it is impossible to say for certain what the logo represents or what company or organization it belongs to. […] >>

A me invece, con uguale prompt,  Gemini dà esito opposto, riferendosi proprio alla parola Hyundai:

Ma l’AI non è il consumatore medio, essendo la sua logica operativa assai diversa da quella umana (parrebbe).

Servizi di “print on demand” violano il diritto di marchio? Probabilmente si

Eric Goldman dà notizia di e link a US DIST. COURT-WESTERN DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN SOUTHERN DIVISION 1 marzo 2024 ,Case No. 1:23-cv-611 , Canvafishj c. Pixels.com, che non stoppa la domanda per violazione di marchio di un’artista contro il servizio  di print on demand offerto da Pixels.com.

La riproduzione, fatta a richeista del cliente, costituisce uso del marchio altrui: <<Even with those gaps, viewing the allegations in a light most favorable to Canvasfish, and considering the greater degree of control Pixels exercises over its manufacturing and shipping process than Redbubble, Canvasfish has made a plausible case that Pixels is a “user” of the trademarks on the products it displays on its websites, and Canvasfish has therefore stated a plausible trademark infringement claim>>.

Però, si badi, il ruolo giocato da Pixels è in effetti significativo: <<Pixels’ services allow third-party creators to upload artwork, photographs, and any other digital images they choose to any of its websites. Pixels does not police the content that is uploaded. (Id. ¶ 23.) Once creators have uploaded images, consumers can browse the entire catalog of content and purchase a number of physical products bearing those images which Pixels will then manufacture and ship anywhere in the country. (Id.) Pixels offers “canvas, wood, and acrylic art prints, greeting cards, phone cases, duvet covers, pillows, shower curtains, and tote bags.” (Id. ¶ 24.) When a consumer has selected an image and a physical product, that image is  sent to a Pixels printing facility where the image is printed onto the product and shipped to the purchaser. (Id. ¶ 27.) Typically, the images are printed on “low-quality products, often overseas.” (Id. ¶ 50.)   In addition to the printing and shipping services Pixels provides, it also offers an augmented reality application through its mobile app that allows potential buyers to see what the selected artwork will look like when it is hung on their wall. (Id. ¶ 25.) “Pixels is actively involved in nearly every aspect of its users’ sales.” (Id. ¶ 28.) It maintains the library of art, acts as the payment processor, and manufactures, prints, warehouses, and ships each product sold through its websites and mobile applications. (Id.)>>

Viene fatta proseguire anche l’azione basata su violazione di copyright

Eric Goldman oggi 6 marzo 2024 dà notizia di altra analoga causa decisa in sostanza nello stesso modo.

L’onere della prova dell’esaurimento el marcjhio

Interessante segnalazione da aprte di Marcel Pemsel in IPKat di Corte di Giustizia C-367/21 del 18.01.2024, Hewlette Packard v. Senetic sulll’oggetto.

L’onere delle prova (poi: odp) spetterà in linea di principio al convenuto, non al titolare del marchio.

Solo che il primo può avere serie difficoltà pratiche nel dare la prova che i prodotti de quibus erano già stato immessi in commercio in altro stato UE (anzi SEE).

La CG dice che allora la regola sull’odp va adattata : in particolare quando cì’è il rischi di compartimentazione dei mercati, cioè quiando cioè la condotta del titolare compromette la libertà di circolazine delle merci sancita dai Trattati UE.

Il che succede quando il titolare tiene condotte particolarmente omertose come nel caso sde quo: i prodotti erano privi di marchio sull’origine o sulla prima immissione e addirittura , interpellato onestamente e apertamente dal terzo convenuto, il titolare si era  rifiutati di dare chiarimenti sull’origine dei prodotti alla base dell’interpello (silenzio informativo pure dal soggetto dal quale il terzo aveVA acquistato) .

Si tratta tecnicamente di un abuso del diritto (ma la Corte non lo menziona se non indirettamente al § 13 , dove riporta l’art. 3.2 della dir. 2004/48) che ne impedisce l’esercizio: diniego di effetti, cioè,  che un ordinamento serio non può non prevedere in tale caso (resta da vedere quale sia la base normativa UE, da noi essendo la buona fede nel caso di contratto e la solidarietà costituzionale ex art. 2 Cost. in caso di pretesa violazione aquiliana).

<<55  Per quanto riguarda la questione di quale sia la parte su cui grava l’onere della prova dell’esaurimento del diritto conferito dal marchio dell’Unione europea, occorre rilevare, da un lato, che tale questione non è disciplinata né dall’articolo 13 del regolamento n. 207/2009, né dall’articolo 15 del regolamento 2017/1001, né da alcuna altra disposizione di questi due regolamenti.

56      D’altro lato, sebbene gli aspetti procedurali del rispetto dei diritti di proprietà intellettuale, compreso il diritto esclusivo previsto dall’articolo 9 del regolamento n. 207/2009, divenuto articolo 9 del regolamento 2017/1001, siano disciplinati, in linea di principio, dal diritto nazionale, quale armonizzato dalla direttiva 2004/48, che, come risulta in particolare dagli articoli da 1 a 3, riguarda le misure, le procedure e i mezzi di ricorso necessari per garantire il rispetto dei diritti di proprietà intellettuale (v., in tal senso, sentenza del 17 novembre 2022, Harman International Industries, C‑175/21, EU:C:2022:895, punto 56), occorre necessariamente constatare che tale direttiva, in particolare i suoi articoli 6 e 7, che rientrano nel capo II, sezione 2, della stessa direttiva, intitolata «Elementi di prova», non disciplina la questione dell’onere della prova dell’esaurimento del diritto conferito dal marchio.

57      Tuttavia, la Corte ha ripetutamente affermato che un operatore che detiene prodotti immessi sul mercato del SEE con un marchio dell’Unione europea dal titolare di tale marchio o con il suo consenso trae diritti dalla libera circolazione delle merci, garantita dagli articoli 34 e 36 TFUE, nonché dall’articolo 15, paragrafo 1, del regolamento 2017/1001, che i giudici nazionali devono salvaguardare (sentenza del 17 novembre 2022, Harman International Industries, C‑175/21, EU:C:2022:895, punto 69 e giurisprudenza ivi citata).

58      A tal riguardo, sebbene la Corte abbia dichiarato, in linea di principio, compatibile con il diritto dell’Unione una norma di diritto nazionale di uno Stato membro in forza della quale l’esaurimento del diritto conferito da un marchio costituisce un mezzo di difesa, di modo che l’onere della prova incomba al convenuto che deduce tale motivo, essa ha altresì precisato che le prescrizioni derivanti dalla tutela della libera circolazione delle merci possono richiedere che tale regola probatoria subisca adattamenti (v., in tal senso, sentenza dell’8 aprile 2003, Van Doren + Q, C‑244/00, EU:C:2003:204, punti da 35 a 37).

59      Così, le modalità nazionali di assunzione e di valutazione della prova dell’esaurimento del diritto conferito da un marchio devono rispettare le prescrizioni derivanti dal principio della libera circolazione delle merci e, pertanto, devono essere adattate qualora siano tali da consentire al titolare di tale marchio di compartimentare i mercati nazionali, favorendo in tal modo la conservazione delle differenze di prezzo esistenti fra gli Stati membri (v., in tal senso, sentenza del 17 novembre 2022, Harman International Industries, C‑175/21, EU:C:2022:895, punto 50 e giurisprudenza ivi citata).

60      Di conseguenza, quando il convenuto nell’azione di contraffazione riesce a dimostrare che sussiste un rischio reale di compartimentazione dei mercati nazionali qualora egli stesso dovesse sostenere l’onere di provare che i prodotti sono stati immessi in commercio nell’Unione o nel SEE dal titolare del marchio o con il suo consenso, spetta al giudice nazionale adito regolare la ripartizione dell’onere di provare l’esaurimento del diritto conferito dal marchio (v., in tal senso, sentenza dell’8 aprile 2003, Van Doren + Q, C‑244/00, EU:C:2003:204, punto 39).

61      Nel caso di specie, dalla domanda di pronuncia pregiudiziale risulta che il titolare dei marchi dell’Unione europea di cui trattasi gestisce un sistema di distribuzione selettiva nell’ambito del quale i prodotti contrassegnati da tali marchi non recano alcuna marcatura che consenta ai terzi di identificare il mercato sul quale sono destinati ad essere commercializzati, che il titolare rifiuta di comunicare tale informazione ai terzi e che i fornitori della parte convenuta non sono inclini a rivelare le proprie fonti di approvvigionamento.

62      A quest’ultimo proposito, occorre rilevare che, in un siffatto sistema di distribuzione, il fornitore si impegna generalmente a vendere i beni o i servizi oggetto del contratto, direttamente o indirettamente, solo a distributori selezionati sulla base di criteri definiti, mentre tali distributori si impegnano a non vendere tali beni o servizi a distributori non autorizzati nel territorio delimitato dal fornitore per l’attuazione di siffatto sistema di distribuzione.

63      In simili circostanze, far gravare sul convenuto nell’azione per contraffazione l’onere della prova del luogo in cui i prodotti contrassegnati dal marchio da esso commercializzati sono stati immessi in commercio per la prima volta dal titolare di tale marchio, o con il suo consenso, potrebbe consentire a detto titolare di contrastare le importazioni parallele dei prodotti contrassegnati da detto marchio, anche se la restrizione della libera circolazione delle merci che ne deriverebbe non sarebbe giustificata dalla tutela del diritto conferito da questo stesso marchio.

64      Infatti, il convenuto nell’azione per contraffazione incontrerebbe notevoli difficoltà a fornire una prova del genere, a causa della comprensibile riluttanza dei suoi fornitori a rivelare la loro fonte di approvvigionamento all’interno della rete di distribuzione del titolare dei marchi dell’Unione europea di cui trattasi.

65      Inoltre, anche qualora il convenuto nell’azione di contraffazione riuscisse a dimostrare che i prodotti recanti i marchi dell’Unione europea di cui trattasi provengono dalla rete di distribuzione selettiva del titolare di tali marchi nell’Unione europea o nel SEE, detto titolare sarebbe in grado di impedire qualsiasi futura possibilità di approvvigionamento da parte del membro della sua rete di distribuzione che ha violato i suoi obblighi contrattuali (v., in tal senso, sentenza dell’8 aprile 2003, Van Doren + Q, C‑244/00, EU:C:2003:204, punto 40).

66      Pertanto, in circostanze come quelle descritte al punto 61 della presente sentenza, spetterà al giudice nazionale adito procedere ad un adeguamento della ripartizione dell’onere della prova dell’esaurimento dei diritti conferiti dai marchi dell’Unione europea di cui trattasi facendo gravare sul titolare di questi ultimi l’onere di dimostrare di aver realizzato o autorizzato la prima messa in circolazione degli esemplari dei prodotti di cui trattasi al di fuori del territorio dell’Unione o di quello del SEE. Qualora sia fornita tale prova, spetterà al convenuto nell’azione per contraffazione dimostrare che i medesimi esemplari sono stati successivamente importati nel SEE dal titolare del marchio o con il suo consenso (v., in tal senso, sentenza dell’8 aprile 2003, Van Doren + Q, C‑244/00, EU:C:2003:204, punto 41 e giurisprudenza ivi citata).>>

Interessante è anche la questione sulla competenza a regolare l’odp: europea, rientrando nel diritto dei marchi armonizzato, o nazionale, rientrando nella ‘area processuale? Propenderei per la seconda.

La mascherina del radiatore, sagomata sì da ricordare il marchio Audi per fungere da supporto e fissarci l’emblema originale, è uso del marchio ma non fruisce dell’eccezione dell’uso referenziale lecito

Avevo già dato conto della posizione dell’AG Medina   nella lite.

Ricordo il marchio azionato da Audi:

Ora la Corte di giustizia 25.01.2024, C-334/22, Audi AG c. GQ, decide il rinvio pregiudiziale in senso diverso.  In particolare ritiene che :

1) il supporto per l’emblema  Audi , fissato sulla e facente parte della mascherina del radiatore, costituisce uso del segno;

2) il supporto così sagomato al citato scopo non fruisce dell’eccezione di uso referenziale lecito ex art. 14.1.c) reg. 2017/1001 (“per identificare o fare riferimento a prodotti o servizi come prodotti o servizi del titolare di tale marchio, specie se l’uso di tale marchio è necessario per contraddistinguere la destinazione di un prodotto o servizio, in particolare come accessori o pezzi di ricambio.”).

Entrambe questioni non semplici. Sul secondo punto ecco il passaggio della CG:

premessa generale:

<<54  L’obiettivo della limitazione, prevista da tale ipotesi, del diritto esclusivo conferito dal marchio è di consentire ai fornitori di prodotti o di servizi complementari a prodotti o servizi offerti dal titolare di un marchio di utilizzare tale marchio al fine di informare, in modo comprensibile e completo, il pubblico sulla destinazione del prodotto che commercializzano o del servizio che offrono o, in altri termini, sul nesso utilitaristico esistente tra i loro prodotti o i loro servizi e quelli del suddetto titolare del marchio (v., per analogia, sentenze del 17 marzo 2005, Gillette Company e Gillette Group Finland, C‑228/03, EU:C:2005:177, punti 33 e 34, nonché dell’11 gennaio 2024, Inditex, C‑361/22, EU:C:2024:17, punto 51).

55 Pertanto, l’uso di un marchio da parte di un terzo per designare o menzionare prodotti o servizi come quelli del titolare di tale marchio quando tale uso è necessario per contraddistinguere la destinazione di un prodotto commercializzato da tale terzo o di un servizio offerto da quest’ultimo rientra, ai sensi dell’articolo 14, paragrafo 1, lettera c), del regolamento 2017/1001, in una delle ipotesi in cui l’uso del marchio non può essere vietato dal suo titolare (v., in tal senso, sentenza dell’11 gennaio 2024, Inditex, C‑361/22, EU:C:2024:17, punto 52). Tale limitazione del diritto esclusivo conferito al titolare del marchio dall’articolo 9 di tale regolamento si applica, tuttavia, solo se detto uso di tale marchio da parte del terzo è conforme alle pratiche di lealtà in campo industriale e commerciale, ai sensi dell’articolo 14, paragrafo 2, di detto regolamento>>

Applicando al caso de quo (con linguaggio non chiarissimo):

<<Nel caso di specie, dalla decisione di rinvio risulta che l’elemento della griglia per radiatori la cui forma è identica o simile al marchio AUDI consente di fissare l’emblema che rispecchia tale marchio su detta griglia. Come risulta altresì dalla decisione di rinvio e dalle osservazioni delle parti, la scelta della forma di tale elemento è guidata dalla volontà di commercializzare una griglia per radiatori che assomigli nel modo più fedele possibile alla griglia per radiatori originale del costruttore degli autoveicoli di cui trattasi.

57 Orbene, occorre distinguere una siffatta situazione, nella quale un’impresa non economicamente collegata al titolare del marchio appone un segno identico o simile a tale marchio sui pezzi di ricambio da essa commercializzati e destinati ad essere integrati nei prodotti di tale titolare, da una situazione in cui una tale impresa, senza tuttavia apporre un segno identico o simile al marchio su tali pezzi di ricambio, faccia un uso di tale marchio per indicare che detti pezzi di ricambio sono destinati ad essere integrati nei prodotti del titolare di detto marchio. Sebbene la seconda di tali situazioni rientri nell’ipotesi di cui al punto 55 della presente sentenza, la prima di dette situazioni non vi rientra. L’apposizione di un segno identico o simile al marchio sul prodotto commercializzato dal terzo eccede, come osservato dall’avvocato generale al paragrafo 57 delle sue conclusioni, l’uso a scopo di riferimento di cui all’articolo 14, paragrafo 1, lettera c), del regolamento 2017/1001 e non rientra quindi in alcuna delle ipotesi coperte da tale disposizione.

58 Ne consegue che, quando un segno, identico o simile a un marchio dell’Unione europea, costituisce un elemento di un pezzo di ricambio per autoveicoli, progettato per il fissaggio dell’emblema del costruttore di tali veicoli su quest’ultimo e non è utilizzato per designare o fare riferimento a prodotti o servizi come prodotti o servizi del titolare di tale marchio, ma per riprodurre nel modo più fedele possibile un prodotto di tale titolare, un siffatto uso di detto marchio non rientra nell’ambito di applicazione dell’articolo 14, paragrafo 1, lettera c), del regolamento 2017/1001>>.

Mi pare dubbio cher la sagomatura del supporto sul radiatore non sia <<necessario per contraddistinguere la destinazione di un prodotto o servizio, in particolare come accessori o pezzi di ricambio>>.

Pubblicità di concorso a premi riproducente il marchio apposto sul prodotto dato in premio: uso referenziale lecito o no?

Risposta pilatesca della Corte di Giustizia nella sentenza 24.01.2024, C-361/22, Inditex v. Bongiorno Myalert (segnalazione di Alessandro Cerri in IPKat).

La norma di riferimento è l’art. 6.1.c) della dir. 2008/95 (il titolare non può lvietare l’uso altrui del proprio marchio “se esso è necessario per contraddistinguere la destinazione di un prodotto o servizio, in particolare come accessori o pezzi di ricambio”).

La CG , dopo aver detto che la norma è più restrittiva di quella corrispondente della dir. 20115/2436 (non può vietare l’uso “del marchio d’impresa per identificare o fare riferimento a prodotti o servizi come prodotti o servizi del titolare di tale marchio, specie se l’uso del marchio è necessario per contraddistinguere la destinazione di un prodotto o servizio, in particolare come accessori o pezzi di ricambio.”), conclude che tocca al giudice nazionale stabilire se nel caso de quo sia invocabile o no.

Nessun aiuto per il giudice nazionale, dunque.

Letteralmente non è invocabile. DAto però che per la successiva dir. 2436 lo sarebbe , è da vedere se ciò possa indurre ad una latissima interpretazione tale da renderla applicabile.

Si potrebbe invece pensare di invocare la lett. b) (indicaizoni descrittive etc.). Infatti il marchio ZARA sul prodotto dato a premio serve a dare un ‘idea del suo valore economico e/o attrattivo,  per indurre i potenziali consumatore a partecipare al concorso.

Confondibilità tra marchi: l’appartenenza al genus animali “che volano” (farfalla v. uccelli) non basta per ravvisarla

Si considerino i seguenti segni  per prodotti identici (borse, abbigliamento etc.)

sopra il segno chiesto in registrazione
qui sopra l’anteriorità opposta

Anna Maria Stein su IPKat segnala la decisione EUIPO Div. di Opposizione OPPOSIZIONE N. B 3 179 053, Cris Conf spa v. Passaggio Obbligato spa, del 11.01.2024.

L’ufficio esclusde la confondibilità ordinaria, soprattuto per  l’assenza di vicinanza concettuale: << A livello concettuale, i segni sono dissimili poiché saanno associati a significati diversi veicolati dagli uccellini e dalla farfalla rispettivamente. Di fatto, la semplice appartenenza alla specie animale non è in alcun modo sufficiente a evocare una similitudine concettuale. Infatti, per giurisprudenza ormai consolidata, il mero fatto che due simboli possano essere raggruppati sotto un termine generico comune non li rende in alcun modo simili dal punto di vista concettuale. Ad esempio, il Tribunale ha ritenuto che, sebbene una mela e una pera possano avere caratteristiche comuni, trattandosi in entrambi i casi di frutti strettamente correlati tra loro in termini biologici e simili in quanto a dimensioni, colore, consistenza, tali caratteristiche comuni incidono in maniera davvero limitata sull’impressione complessiva. Di conseguenza, il Tribunale ha concluso che tali elementi sono insufficienti a controbilanciare le evidenti differenze concettuali esistenti tra i marchi, constatazione questa che li ha resi concettualmente dissimili (31/01/2019, T-215/17, PEAR (fig.) / APPLE BITE (fig.) et al., EU:T:2019:45, § 77-79)>>.

Giudizio dubbio: i) intanto si tratta non solo di animali ma di animali che volano; ii) poi la dimensione probabilmente ridotta rende difficile cogliere subito la differenza , o almeno di coglierla in maniera tale da far pensare a due aziende in concorrenza invece che a varianti di un’unica idea creativa nella scelta dei segni distintivi aziendali.

Nè c’è distintività accresciuta (sempre nella confondibilitò ordianria, non da rinomanza) : <<Infatti, il carattere distintivo accresciuto richiede il riconoscimento del marchio da parte del pubblico di riferimento e, nell’effettuare tale valutazione, occorre tenere conto, in particolare, delle caratteristiche intrinseche del marchio, compreso il fatto che esso contiene o meno un elemento descrittivo dei prodotti o dei servizi per i quali è stato registrato; la quota di mercato detenuta dal marchio; l’intensità, l’estensione geografica e la durata dell’uso di tale marchio, l’entità degli investimenti effettuati dall’impresa per promuovere il marchio; la proporzione del pubblico di riferimento che, grazie al marchio, identifica i prodotti o i servizi come provenienti da una determinata impresa; e dichiarazioni di camere di commercio e d’industria o di altre associazioni professionali (22/06/1999, C-342/97, Lloyd Schuhfabrik, EU:C:1999:323, § 23).

Inoltre, le prove dell’acquisizione di un carattere distintivo accresciuto in seguito all’uso devono riguardare sia (i) l’area geografica di riferimento sia (ii) i prodotti e/o servizi pertinenti. La natura, i fattori, le prove e la valutazione del carattere distintivo accresciuto sono gli stessi della notorietà, anche se la soglia per la constatazione di un carattere distintivo accresciuto può essere inferiore.

Quanto al contenuto delle prove, maggiori sono le indicazioni che esse forniscono circa i vari fattori dai quali si può dedurre l’elevato carattere distintivo, tanto più rilevante e determinante. In particolare, le prove che, nel complesso, forniscono scarsi dati e informazioni quantitativi o nessuna, non saranno idonee a fornire indicazioni su fattori vitali quali la conoscenza dei marchi, la quota di mercato e l’intensità dell’uso e, di conseguenza, non saranno sufficienti per affermare l’esistenza di un carattere distintivo accresciuto>>.

Giudicando in base alle stesse prove (sempre profilo interessante per i pratici), è poi rigettata pure la domanda basata sulla rinmmanza.

Diritto di marchio tra parodia e free speech: nuova applicazione di Jack Daniel’s Properties, Inc. v. VIP Products LLC, del 2023 da parte del 9 circuito

Lisa Ramsey su Mastodon ci notizia di PUNCHBOWL, INC., vs. AJ PRESS, LLC, appello 9 circuito, 12.01.2024, No.21-55881.

La decisione è abbastanza facile.

Applica la regola, posta da Jack Daniel’s Properties, Inc. v. VIP Products del 2023, per cui il Roger test (esonero da legge marchi se c’è A) vero free speech/rilevanza artistica, e B) assenza di esplicit misleading del consumatori) non si applica quando il segno altrui è usato come marchio.

REgola di buon senso, emergente pure dal nostro art. 21 cod. propr. ind. (ove però manca una previsione regolante il conflitto tra marchio ed esercizio della livbertà di espressione)

“LARA CROFT” vs “LoraCraft”: un caso di tutela della rinomanza extramerceologica

Marcel Pemsel su IPKat segnala Opposition Division EUIPO Nо B 3 180 999 del 30.11.2023.

L’ufficio esclude la confondibilità ordinaria ex art. 8.1, EUTMR per carenza di affinità merceologica (corde e packaging per imballaggio vs. ceramiche etc.)

Riconosce però la tutela allargata per ingiustificato vantaggio dalla notorietà altrui ex art. 8,.5 EUTMR

<<It has to be recalled that the contested goods have a link to the earlier reputed goods and services, as explained in section c) above. Furthermore, the earlier mark enjoys a high reputation in the European Union in connection with video games. Consequently, and according to case-law, earlier marks with a strong reputation will be recognised in almost any context, particularly as a result of their above-average quality, which reflects a positive message, influencing the choice of the consumers as regards goods or services of other producers/providers.

Furthermore, it is important to underline that the earlier trade mark is inherently distinctive in relation to the goods and services they are registered for. This fact makes it even more likely that the applicant will attempt to benefit from the value of the opponent’s sign since such a distinctive trade mark as “Lara Croft” will be recognised in almost any context. The mere fact that the applicant changed the position of two letters will in no way impede such a recognition, as the structure of the contested sign – female Christian name and last name – is still identical to the earlier right.

An unfair advantage occurs when a third party exploits the reputation of the earlier mark to the benefit of its own marketing efforts. In practice, the applicant ‘hooks onto’ the renowned mark and uses it as a vehicle to encourage consumer interest in its own products. The advantage for the applicant is a substantial saving on investment in promotion and publicity for its own mark, since it benefits from that which has made the earlier mark famous. This is unfair because it is done in a parasitic way (08/02/2002, R 472/2001 1, BIBA/ BIBA).

Furthermore, in view of the earlier trade mark special attractiveness, it may be exploited even outside its natural market sector, by merchandising (as demonstrated by the opponent). Hence, as the earlier mark has a high reputation and the commercial and as especially the merchandising context in which the goods are promoted are very close, the Opposition Division can accept the opponent’s claim that consumers of goods in Class 9 and in Class 22 make a connection between the applicant’s goods and the reputed mark Lara Croft used by the opponent.

The opponent has invested large sums of money and effort in creating a certain brand image associated with its trade mark, by creating a fictious character which attracts the admiration of the public, inciting them to be a close as possible to this character (for instance women dressed like Lara Croft in fan events), and one way of doing this is by buying merchandising goods, bearing the name Lara Croft.

This image associated with a trade mark confers on it an – often significant – economic value, which is independent of that of the goods for which it is registered. Consequently, Article 8(5) EUTMR aims at protecting this advertising function and the investment made in creating a certain brand image by granting protection to reputed trade mark, irrespective of the similarity of the goods or services or of a likelihood of confusion, provided it can be demonstrated that use of the contested application without due cause would take unfair advantage of, or be detrimental to, the distinctive character or repute of the earlier mark.

The notion of taking unfair advantage of distinctiveness or repute covers cases where the applicant benefits from the attractiveness of the earlier right by using for its services a sign that is similar (or identical) to one widely known in the market and, therefore, misappropriating its attractive powers and advertising value, or exploiting its reputation, image and prestige. This may lead to unacceptable situations of commercial parasitism, where the applicant is allowed to take a ‘free ride’ on the investment of the opponent in promoting and building up goodwill for its mark, as it may stimulate sales of its products to an extent that is disproportionately high for the size of its promotional investment. In its judgement of 18/06/2009, C 487/07, L’Oréal, EU:C:2009:378, § 41, 49, the Court indicated that unfair advantage exists where there is a transfer of the image of the mark, or of the characteristics that it projects, to the goods identified by the identical or similar sign. By riding on the coat-tails of the reputed mark, the applicant benefits from the power of attraction, reputation and prestige of the reputed mark. The applicant also exploits, without paying any financial compensation, the marketing effort expended by the proprietor of the earlier mark in order to create and maintain the image of that mark.

The use of the mark applied for in connection with the abovementioned goods will almost certainly draw the relevant consumer’s attention to the opponent’s highly similar and very well-known mark. The contested mark will become associated with the aura of fame that surrounds the Lara Croft brand. Many consumers are very likely to think that there is a direct connection between the goods of the applicant, and the famous Lara Croft character, as the sings are made up of identical letters, or might not even notice the difference.

Article 8(5) EUTMR exists to prevent this type of situation, where one mark takes unfair advantage of its distinctive character and repute. The applicant could take unfair advantage of the fact that the public knows the trade mark Lara Croft so well, in order to introduce its own similar trade mark without incurring any great risk and the cost of introducing a totally unknown trade mark to the market.

On the basis of the above, the Opposition Division concludes that the contested trade mark will take unfair advantage of the distinctive character or the repute of the earlier trade mark.

The opponent also argues that use of the contested trade mark would be detrimental to the repute of the earlier trade mark.

As seen above, the existence of a risk of injury is an essential condition for Article 8(5) EUTMR to apply. The risk of injury may be of three different types. For an opposition to be well founded in this respect it is sufficient if only one of these types is found to exist. In the present case, as seen above, the Opposition Division has already concluded that the contested trade mark would take unfair advantage of the distinctive character or repute of the earlier trade mark. It follows that there is no need to examine whether other types also apply>>.

Decisione esatta.